SCENE | New Orleans, LA.

A concert by the Preservation Hall Jazz Band at Preservation Hall, New Orleans, 1965. 

We're in New Orleans this weekend, going full steam into all things Cajun and jazzy. If any of you NOLA natives or aficionados have any Tomboy Style-y recs, I'd be so grateful!

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15 comments:

Anonymous said...

For us Southern Californians, the highlight of our trip was the swamp tour. Absolutely beautiful in the pouring rain.

Anonymous said...

I moved to nola in July, and it is amazing. You must see music - if you can find tickets to the radiators show at tipitinas this weekend, do it. King cake from Randazzos is also delicious and only available this time of year. Lastly, Cochon butcher for amazing sandwiches.

Jacqui said...

My husband and I were actually just in NOLA over Christmas. There's a ton of good food, but Cane and Table was exceptional (killer cocktails and crispy rum ribs).

Try Magazine Street for shopping - I especially loved Clover Boutique, which had a great selection of beautiful, minimalist clothing. Have fun!

Jacqui | birds-of-a-thread.com

janjamm said...

The picture totally creeps me out. The solemn white kids staring, motionless with flat affect at groovy old master jazz musicians, playing their hearts out.

Rebecca said...

@janjamm-- I think it's all a matter of interpretation. I remember seeing this great interview with Donald "Duck" Dunn of Booker T & the MGs (one of the first racially integrated rock/r&b bands)describing the difference between American audiences v.European ones, c. 1967. He said American kids would go nuts at the show & were clearly there for the social experience-- to be part of a scene. The European kids were solemn and still-- they were there to experience the music. I realize this is an American pic, but perhaps that's what's going on here?-- a sign of calm appreciation. Also,we have to remember that at this time, white kids listening to "black" music was a fairly new phenomenon, and, for as lifeless as the young people in this image seem, they were probably pushing some boundaries. White people accepting (and then appropriating) black music is a complicated history, but I don't see this picture as creepy, I see it at as the beginning of a rebellion.

Kathryn McCourt said...

sazeracs at the Roosevelt....

tres tomboy.

Anonymous said...

It sure is tempting to 'interpret' this photo. I'd say the guy in the doorway, older looking with glasses, could be the teacher/professor. He's looking at the group of young people almost assessing their reactions to the music. I think he took his class to hear this music. I too am not sure that these kids are thrilled to be there. The young woman in the corner looks bored, boardering on hostile. Perhaps they are all students of classical music, broadening their education.

Anonymous said...

The Maple Leaf for music. Guy's Poboys, Frankie and Johnny's for seafood, Port of Call for drinks, Cochon Restaurant (get the rabbit liver. No seriously.). Sucre on Magazine Street. Dante's Kitchen for brunch

janjamm said...

This picture is of the George Lewis Band, George on Clarinet. Here's a link to his ragtime music. See if you can listen and sit still. To the rebellion! http://www.last.fm/music/George+Lewis

Rebecca said...

@janjamm-- I can dig it!Thanks for the share :)

Anonymous said...

You have to go to Upperline. Late night at Rock and Bowl.

Anonymous said...

Bacchanal in the Bywater.

Online Fshion said...

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petrichore said...

Trashy Diva clothing (several locations) - made using vintage '40s and '50s patterns, with high-quality silk crepe and other materials. Also, I like the Green Goddess restaurant on Exchange Alley - amazing "foodie" NOLA cuisine.

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